7 Scents Orange Essential Oil Blends Well With

Essential Oil Blends

Did you know citrus essential oils aren’t made the same way other essential oils are made? Actually, they’re unique from other oils because they use a completely different extraction method. So, instead of using the distillation process to create these strongly scented droplets, citrus oils are made by cold-pressing the rinds. This way, orange essential oil comes out smelling nearly identical to what you might inhale if you pressed your nose to a juicy, ripe orange fresh off the tree. Orange essential oils blend well with numerous other oils to create a plethora of tantalizing scents and benefits.

On its own, orange essential oil has uplifting properties. It has been used to calm anxiety and promote a better mood in various case studies.[1] Putting it in the diffuser in the morning, or diluting it with a carrier oil and rubbing it on your skin can help you feel more positive through the day. Not only that, but you can add this oil to your all-natural cleaning products to use around your home too. Coming up, we’ll talk about what orange essential oil blends well with. This way, you can find the best blends that inspire you to be your happiest self.

Fragrance Profile of Orange Essential Oil

Orange essential oil in clear bottle next to a halved orange and orange rind

Orange essential oil is a cheerful and sunny oil that packs a punch. As you’ve learned, this oil originates directly from the pressed rinds of oranges, which is the most aromatic part of the fruit. So, it’s just one step away from the actual summertime fruit itself. It’s a fresh smelling oil that awakens your nose with its deep and potent citrus aroma. Orange oil is slightly tangy with a sharp bite on the first whiff. As you inhale deeper, sweeter notes come up too.

Orange essential oil blends well with other citrus oils as well as warmer-scented oils too. Creating these blends isn’t too hard. But keep in mind, to get the maximum benefits, you’ll want to know what smells and oils compliment one another. Here’s where we can help.

7 Scents Orange Essential Oil Blends Well With

Orange essential oil is a refreshing blast of citrus all on its own. However, when used in combination with other oils, you can create an endless amount of special scents. You can use these essential oil blends for soap, aromatherapy, in topical moisturizers, and more. Now you might be asking yourself, “what does orange essential oil blend well with”? Don’t worry, we’ll tell you right now! And on top of that, we’ll do you one better by sharing the benefits of each blend too. This way, you can use each one to its maximum capacity.

1. Cinnamon

A flat lay of a vial of orange essential oil, cinnamon sticks and fresh oranges
Looking for an antimicrobial, antifungal, and antiseptic essential oil blend? You must try a spicy cinnamon essential oil!

Orange and cinnamon essential oil blend to try: Add five drops of cinnamon and five drops of orange essential oil to a 50ml bottle of distilled water. Use it to clean your home surfaces.

Spicy cinnamon essential oil is antimicrobial, antifungal, and antiseptic.[2] This makes it an ideal partner for orange in cleaning products around the home. Additionally, you can combine orange and cinnamon with a carrier oil, like hemp or coconut oil, and rub it onto your feet if you feel any abnormal itching happening, as it can be a sign of fungal growth. Not only will it leave you feeling refreshed, but you’ll also smell delicious!

2. Lemon

Orange and lemon essential oils blends in two small bottles surrounded by freshly cut orange and lemon pieces

Orange and lemon essential oil blend to try: Combine one part lemon essential oil with two parts orange essential oil in your diffuser, according to the machine’s directions. Enjoy in the early morning to uplift and motivate you for your day!

Orange essential oil blends well with lemon for a number of reasons. First, lemon essential oil is also a citrus oil, derived from the lemon’s rind. This makes the pair have a strong, fruity, sharp aroma that complements each other. Second, it’s also a great addition to cleaning products for its antibacterial and antifungal properties.[3] However you use lemon and orange oils together, they’ll never let you (or your nose) down!

3. Vanilla

Vanilla, lemon, and orange essential oils blends in bottles
With so many blends to try making for yourself, you’ll never get bored with using orange essential oil.

Orange and vanilla essential oil blend to try: On a cool fall evening, craft up a homemade vanilla and orange essential oil candle. All you need are the two oils, soy wax, a wick, and a jar or cup.

There’s nothing like the smell of baking with vanilla. To amp it up, add a bit of orange zest to the mix and you’re sure to have a winning treat. If you want that delicious scent at your fingertips, this oil combination will do the trick. These smells compliment each other well because the vanilla has warm and calming hints, while the orange is more potent and bright. Together, they make a remarkable pair to put into your diffuser, a candle, or right on your body with a carrier oil.

4. Sandalwood

Sandalwood and orange essential oil blend

Orange and sandalwood essential oil blend to try: To help acne or dry skin, mix two drops of sandalwood and one drop of orange essential oils together. Add the blend into a 50ml bottle of your nightly moisturizer.

This essential oil has a woody, dry smell that is subtly sweet at the same time. Plus, orange essential oil blends well with sandalwood to combat skin conditions because sandalwood is anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial.[4] Together, orange and sandalwood are a pleasant duo for acne, psoriasis, or eczema. Just remember, don’t use it topically if you plan to spend time in the sunshine. That’s because citrus oils can cause a skin reaction in direct sunlight. 

5. Clove

A vial of clove essential oil blend
Clove essential oil offers users many benefits, including the fact that it fights off bacteria on the skin.

Orange and clove essential oil blend to try: To ease a topical candida infection, combine clove and orange essential oils together. Remember to dilute with a carrier oil before rubbing onto the affected area.

Unlike what you might imagine from using the spice in cooking, clove essential oil is incredibly antiseptic and fights off bacteria on the skin.[5] On top of this great health benefit, it smells incredible when paired with orange essential oil. Orange essential oil blends well with clove oil because the sweet and tangy notes of the orange are crossed with the nutty and spicy hints in the clove.

Important: Clove essential oil is one of the few oils that can be toxic to house pets, like dogs or cats. So if you have a pet, refrain from diffusion clove oil, and never put it on your pets topically.

6. Clary Sage

Clary sage and orange essential oil blend in a vial and elegant jug

Orange and clary sage essential oil blend to try: Mix three drops of clary sage and two drops of orange oil with a carrier oil. Rub onto your stomach to ease menstrual cramps.

Clary sage is an earthy, slightly floral oil that pairs well with an undertone of orange. Not only that, but clary sage is also great for women specifically because it can help menstrual cramps when massaged onto the stomach or back.[6] Additionally, it can calm your nerves around that time of the month too, while orange can help uplift you so you can feel more grounded.

7. Ginger

Ginger and orange essential oil vial next to slices of fresh ginger

Orange and ginger essential oil blend to try: Make some DIY natural roll-on perfume by combining equal parts of ginger and orange essential oil with the carrier oil hemp. It’s perfect as a winter scent.

As you might already know, ginger is a common ingredient in anti-nausea medications.[7] However, if you’re not comfortable consuming pure ginger essential oils for nausea, you can diffuse some ginger and orange oil into the air for a stomach-easing blend. The pair together is sweet and could easily be mistaken for dessert.

7 Scents Orange Essential Oil Blends Well With

References

  • [1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3732892/
  • [2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4003790/
  • [3] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6073409/
  • [4] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749697/
  • [5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3769004/
  • [6] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2221169115001033
  • [7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5115784/

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